July Kuku wānanga by Emma Febvre-Richards

Rainbow over the olive grove, Kuku, 6 July. Image by Emma Febvre-Richards, 2019.

Rainbow over the olive grove, Kuku, 6 July. Image by Emma Febvre-Richards, 2019.

 
 

From 4-7 July 2019 members of the Kei Uta Collective and Te Waituhi ā Nuku: Drawing Ecologies reconvened at Huhana, Richard and Tama’s whare (home) at Kuku to continue the korero tuku iho (local oral narratives of place), to hīkoi (walking/talking meetings) over the ancestral lands of hapū of Ngāti Tukorehe and to gather by the fire, share food and process the hauhake (crops) from the farm, such as brining recently harvested olives and freezing late harvest Sturmer apples from the oldest tree on the farm.

The group was made up of Huhana Smith, Emma Febvre-Richards, Marilyn Jones, Maria O’Toole, Lisa Munnelly and Dani McIntosh (all from Massey University, Pōneke), Monique Jansen (Auckland University of Technology), and Louisa King and Penelope Allan (University of Technology, Sydney). The purpose of gathering again was to discuss the creative outputs generated from the first February wānanga, and to more deeply experience the process of instigating ecological transformation and cultural change by using indigenous or Māori-led approaches and kaupapa Māori research methods.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Our early morning hīkoi to the mouth of the Ōhau River estuary clearly revealed the coastal dunes and erosion due to introduced grass species such as marram. We were also very fortunate to view many bird species sheltering in the estuary, including the Kōtuku Ngutupapa (Royal Spoonbill). In re-visiting the wetlands in winter we noticed how the restoration planting had grown and changed since February. The raupo/bulrushes were dormant and brown, waiting for new spring growth but the harakeke and other native plantings were tall and lush. Whanau (family) members had continued planting more harakeke towards a sustainable natural fabric industry. Penny and Louisa interviewed all the Te Waituhi ā Nuku participants about their understanding of the process of wānanga and hui, and how it has generated enhanced cross-cultural understanding to know a place better, and feel the effects of generational processes of colonisation and impacts of climate change upon this whenua.

 
 
 
 

As happens when a group of artists gather in front of a fire with wine and food, the conversation expanded beyond Kuku and our artistic responses to the climate change impacts on Māori coastal ecosystems and economies. We thought about the value of the wānanga and hui process as a model for art and design responses to the climate change emergency. The method, based in kaupapa Māori and enhanced by the value of manaakitanga (caring for vistors), emphasises a more genuine exchange via slow-time, talking and walking lands, which then deepens cross-cultural understanding. We discussed creating a series of site-based or gallery-based activist exhibitions around the world, where collectives of local indigenous communities, artists, designers and scientists are grounded in place across an extended period of time, and develop responses to the climate change challenges we all face – from what ever part of the world we inhabit.

 
 
 

Click here to view artist’s project summaries

 
“Lotto girls” (Monique, Maria, Marilyn, Emma, Huhana and Dani), 5 July. Image by Marilyn Jones, 2019.

“Lotto girls” (Monique, Maria, Marilyn, Emma, Huhana and Dani), 5 July. Image by Marilyn Jones, 2019.

 

MindArt has begun! by Emma Febvre-Richards

 

JULY 2019

Sessions underway

On 17 July the Massey University team, Dementia Wellington and Dr Gary Cheung rolled out the first of eight sessions of the MindArt material and digital drawing programme in Wellington! The participants of these sessions are a mix of caregivers and health professionals for people with dementia (PWD) who will be able to give us feedback on the MindArt programme. This will enable us to refine the sessions and digital applications further, to be ready for ethics approved delivery to PWD at L’Institut Claude Pompidou in Nice, France in November 2019.

Photographs from the first sessions

Photographs from the first sessions

A mixture of caregivers and health professionals for people with dementia participated

A mixture of caregivers and health professionals for people with dementia participated

MARCH 2019

Ethics approval granted

The Aotearoa New Zealand MindArt programme was granted ethics approval! Here are the next steps:

  1. Stage 1 will trial the drawing programme with caregivers of people with dementia in July 2019 in collaboration with Dementia Wellington. This will inform further development of the programme and allow us to have a more targeted ethics application Health and Disability Ethics Committee for the next stage.

  2. Stage 2 will use the same study design but will involve people with mild dementia. The process will be led by our newest team member, medical researcher Dr. Gary Cheung (PhD, FRANZCP, MBChB) an academic and old age psychiatrist based in Auckland:

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DR GARY CHEUNG

Dr Gary Cheung (PhD, FRANZCP, MBChB) is an academic old age psychiatrist. He currently holds a joint appointment between Auckland District Health Board as a community old age psychiatrist and the University of Auckland as a Senior Lecturer. His research interests are centred on improving health outcomes and quality of life and care of older people living in aged residential care and community. He co-leads the translation and research of cognitive stimulation therapy (CST) for mild to moderate dementia in New Zealand.

 

click here to find out more about MedArt & MindArt.

 

Feb Kuku wānanga by Emma Febvre-Richards

Drawing Ecologies/Kei Uta Collective team at Tukorehe Marae, Kuku, Horowhenua 11-16 February 2019

Photo by Huhana Smith, 2019

Photo by Huhana Smith, 2019

 
 

The ‘Drawing Ecologies’ wānanga brought a new iteration of the Kei Uta collective together. This expanding and contracting team of visual language experts were open to embracing the successful Mātauranga Māori research methodologies such as whakapapa (interconnected genealogies), hīkoi (walking talking meetings) and korero tuku iho (local oral narratives of place). To this end, over four days Huhana Smith walked this group through the lower reaches of the Ōhau River, the contiguous wetland projects across Māori shareholder farms, across dune ridgelines to beaches and to coastal protection projects, which are all within ancestral landscapes of great importance to hapū of Ngāti Tukorehe and other related hapū located towards Waikawa. We also stood on 1000 year old dunes systems on Incorporation of Ransfield’s farm, we got hot and bothered in the Waikawa dunefields and cooled ourselves in the moana (sea) at Waikawa. We completed the last of our walks in the cooling forests surrounding Lake Waiwiri or Papaitonga, a remnant low land forest around a freshwater lake within sand country.

 
 
Photo by Huhana Smith, 2019

Photo by Huhana Smith, 2019

 
 

Back at the marae, extensive ‘drawing as expanded practice’ was undertaken during productive artmaking moments. The collaborative stencilled artwork led by Judy Watson (which is shown here in progress) focused on what is important to hapū – namely harvesting of tuna (eels) and inanga (whitebait).

 
 
 
 
 
 

While some 25 Māori and non Māori contemporary artists were invited, the final number was a good sized group whose expertise spanned indigenous culture and practice, tā moko, art, landscape architecture, design, nature and ecologies. Amongst the 12 artist participants were: Sean Bennett Ogden, Tipi Wehipeihana (alongside kuia Aunty Yvonne Wehipeihana-Wilson) from Kuku. Massey University’s Emma Febvre-Richards, Huhana Smith, Jonathan Kay, Marilyn Jones and Maria O’Toole worked alongside Martin Bryant and Louisa King (University Technology, Sydney), Monique Jansen and Carl Douglas (AUT), and the invited Government House Matairangi Mahi Toi international residency artists - Frances Whitehead (Chicago, USA), Tania Kovats (Bath Spa, UK) and Amel Nafti (Valence, France). Indigenous artist and Waanyi woman Judy Watson (Brisbane/Griffith University) also responded to the recent research findings of Phase 1 (2015-2017) and Phase 2 (2017-2019) Deep South Vision Mātauranga projects.

 
 

Photos by Huhana Smith and Monique Jansen, 2019

Drawn To Light by Emma Febvre-Richards

by Lisa Munnelly

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Drawn To Light was part of Wellington’s 2019 Performance Arcade (held 21-24 Feb 2019)

 
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Drawn to Light transformed a shipping container into a hybrid form located somewhere between photo-booth and gallery. With one end of the container a studio and the other end a screen displaying the accumulating collection of portraits over the exhibition period.

 
 
 

DRAWin Festival 2018 by Morgan Hogg

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Sydney Pink

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Xelís De Toro

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Ram Samocha

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Liesje van den Berk

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Lili Robins & Micky Bimble

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Molly Macleod

 

Isabel The Phantomat

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Carli Jefferson

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Jenny Arran

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Fu LE (Florent Schwartz)

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Dejan Mrdja (with Ursula Dimitriou, Bettina Fung and Lucija Križman)

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Kimvi Nguyen

 

Jazz Moreton

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Drawing workshop held by Molly Macleod

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Susan D'Amato Artist Residence by Morgan Hogg

SUSAN D'AMATO: Artist Residencies

Bali

Bali

"Residencies for me are opportunities to immerse myself in new physical, cultural and social environments that allow me to absorb and respond creatively to all that I am in contact with. The aspects of travel, research, exploration and discovery integrates everything I love about life as an artist and seeker. There is something very special about working along side other creatives and sharing the intensity of creative process and practice. I find the balance of work, time, space and community deeply supportive, nourishing, satisfying and joyful. I am grateful for the experiences and friendships I have made through residency participation and hope to continue to explore the inner/outer world it in this way." 

Susan D'Amato's residencies have included:
Purnati Center for the Creative Arts, Bali
The David and Julia White foundation, Costa Rica
Tyrone Guthrie Center, Annaghmakerrig, Ireland
PLAYA, Oregon
Sitka Centre, Oregon
Jentel, Wyoming
The Helene Wurlitzer Foundation, New Mexico

Nyepi celebrations for Balinese New Year

Nyepi celebrations for Balinese New Year

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Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Wyoming

Wyoming

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Oregon

Oregon

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Taos Desert, New Mexico

Taos Desert, New Mexico

Drawing Open Residency at Villa Arson, France by Morgan Hogg

THE DRAWING OPEN RESIDENCY AT VILLA ARSON THIS JANUARY

In January this year Susan D’Amato, Emma Febvre-Richards and Amel Nafti gathered at Villa Arson to workshop future projects/ collaborations, engage with Villa Arson students and of course make work!

Here are some photos from that time….

Who wouldn’t love Villa Arson with a view over the City like this?! That’s Emma’s coffee cup!

Who wouldn’t love Villa Arson with a view over the City like this?! That’s Emma’s coffee cup!

L’Institut Claude Pompidou who Drawing Open is now working with on the Sensing Drawing Project based on bringing together science, drawing and Technology to advance Dementia research.

L’Institut Claude Pompidou who Drawing Open is now working with on the Sensing Drawing Project based on bringing together science, drawing and Technology to advance Dementia research.

Villa Arson students singing and celebrating in the studio!

Villa Arson students singing and celebrating in the studio!

Susan at the Marc Chagall Museum.

Susan at the Marc Chagall Museum.

Ann Guillaume filming on our way to Ste Marguerite where she has based her PhD project. We were very happy to contribute

Ann Guillaume filming on our way to Ste Marguerite where she has based her PhD project. We were very happy to contribute

Emma, Amel and Susan, having some fun on the Ferris wheel on our last evening together!

Emma, Amel and Susan, having some fun on the Ferris wheel on our last evening together!

Reggio Emilia Inspired Dialogue by Morgan Hogg

Drawing Open and REID


On September the 2nd 2017 the group Reggio Emilia Inspired Dialogue, REID for short, came to Massey University Drawing Open space to do and learn more about Drawing as Expanded practice with Emma Febvre-Richards. This group are volunteers (head teachers and academics) who orchestrate four or five professional development events per year in Wellington for ECE teachers, inspired by the pedagogy of Reggio Emilia.

Have a look at the philosophy here:
http://learningmaterialswork.com/product/children-art- artists-the- expressive-languages- of-children- the-artistic-language-of- alberto-burri/
http://www.reggiochildren.it/?libro=rendere-visibile- lapprendimento&lang=en

Watch this space as we are now working towards the possibility of developing a drawing pedagogy in early childhood!
Here are some pictures of the fun we had!

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